Dance of the Elements · DOTE · YA Fantasy

Meet the Character: Jangbahar Part 2

Hi y’all! As some of you may know, I’ve started a new segment detailing the world-building that went into the setting for my series, The Dance of the Elements. The majority of the continent known as Jangbahar is controlled by the Republic of the Sand Sea and you can find more info for that here. Today we are learning all about Kitoi, the tiny and powerful nation just south of the borders of the Republic.

Although Ignited takes place entirely within the borders of the capital of the Republic, Submerged largely takes place in Kitoi and its surrounding areas. I enjoyed showing the differences between the two countries as the story line unfolded.

Kitoi:

Population- 1,263,375

Language- Jangba

Symbol/Flag- A black hand atop a golden orb.

            Kitoi is made up of a large peninsula on the southeastern border of Jangbahar and is directly south of the Republic. Bordered by the Bariq Sea on their western and southern borders and a small nation stretched along their Eastern border, this small yet powerful nation boasts a rich economy due to their sea port.

Kitoi’s capital city, also entitled Kitoi, is sometimes referred to as the Golden City because of the city’s access to some of Jangbahar’s most precious stones. The country’s primary exports are gold and other semi-precious stones and unlike the Republic, access to an oasis fed from an underground pool refrains Kitoi from having to import fresh water. Kitoi does enjoy trade and they often import fine glass and dragon oil from the Republic. Kitoi also boasts a successful slavery trade, and while slavery is tolerated throughout much of Jangbahar it is only legal in Kitoi.

Although the country’s rulers tended toward dictatorship in the past, the country’s current government is more shaped after that of the Republic with elected officials held in various offices. The Cobachon for each office is officiated a specific colored gemstone to represent their position. Since their departure from the dictatorship, the country has prized its new take on bureaucracy.

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